Search

Mr Epidemiology

No, I'm not a skin doctor

Tag

grad student life

New Post on Gradifying: Letters from the Half Way Point: Or, Three Things I’ve Learnt So Far.

Friend of the blog Travis has done regular thesis updates, and I think that updates from those in their PhD can be helpful for those considering or starting out with their graduate education. It gives you a a bit of a roadmap of what to expect, and potential pitfalls you might encounter. Some of you will be half way through a Masters/PhD right now, and I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments – anything you wish you knew before, or even things that went well that you would recommend others do as well.

And, to inject a little class into the proceedings, I’m going to highlight these points with famous quotes from books. I’m sure my English major readers will have a field day with this.

Click here to continue reading!

Mr Epidemiology is moving to PLoS Blogs!

Super exciting news! As of this week, I’ll be a PLoS Blogger!PLoGGer! Or a PLoGster! Yay!

This is very exciting, and I’m looking forward to moving onto the PLoS network. For some perspective, I’m going from my blog (3-5k visits/month) to PLoS Blogs (>200k visits/month). I’ll be writing for their brand new Public Health blog and their Science Education blog, together with some incredible writers, including the very talented Viet Le and Beth Skwarecki on Public Health, as well Jean Flanagan and Cristina Russo on Science-Ed, as well as others (including frequent Mr Epidemiology guest, Lindsay Kobayashi!).

The blogs go live tonight (so if the links don’t work, check back later), and will be available at:

http://blogs.plos.org/publichealth/ and

http://blogs.plos.org/scied/

I’m going to continue to use Mr Epidemiology to aggregate my work on these sites and Gradifying, and will continue to update Mr Epid with other posts and thoughts that don’t fit those three blogs.

As always, I welcome your comments, and hope you’ll join me over at PLoS! And above all, thank you all for your support!

New Post on Gradifying: Higher Education Humour!

While the tradition of oral storytelling has been replaced by the email forward or Facebook message, the idea remains the same. We pass down stories from generation to generation, from postdocs to PhDs to Masters students and onwards. And now those stories take the form of websites, blogposts and cats doing silly things.

I’m going to end the year with some of my favourite funny reads. It’s a stressful time of the semester, and most people have exams and assignments and projects to finish. If you’re really lucky, you also have a bunch to mark before you can leave too! Yay!

And so, in the spirit of the season, I’m going to share some of my favourite links with you to try and lighten that load.

Click here to continue reading!!

New Post on Gradifying: Reference Letters: Who to ask and how to ask for them! Liz Lemon helps us out

At some point in your graduate education you’ll have to ask for a letter of reference. It might be for a funding application (see my previous post) or it might be for another program (med school, law school, PhD programs etc). But you’ll need to ask people to write wonderful, glowing praise for you in their free time. Which is a daunting, and intimidating task.

But the good news is that your profs and supervisors are expecting this. They’ve done it before, and know the process. So don’t be afraid!

And of course, because it’s me, I’ll bringing in a friend to help with the post. So without further ado dear readers, Liz Lemon.

Liz Lemon!

Click here to continue reading!!

New Post On Gradifying: Applying For Funding: Big Bang Theory GIFs and The Joy of Personal Statements

Applying for funding is a tough, but necessary, part of the graduate school experience. But luckily, I’m going to be writing about it in my post today, with GIFs from The Big Bang Theory!

If you hope to continue in academia, constantly applying for funding will be a reality you’ll face until retirement, so might as well start enjoying it. And if you’re in your Masters and thinking about a PhD, you’ll probably be applying for funding for that too, so this cycle never really ends. It’s tough, it sucks, but here are a few tricks you can use to make the whole process much more enjoyable. I’ll be talking mainly about my experiences with OGS and CIHR as those are the funding bodies I’m most familiar with, but if you have experience with NSERC or SSHRC (or any others), please feel free to comment below.

Click here to continue reading!!

New Post on Gradifying: Hitting the Wall: The Graduate School Marathon

The statue of the Tired Man

We’ve talked a lot about resources that are all available for new students, in terms of settling in, finances etc. What we haven’t talked about are things that might affect returning students or those who are approaching the end of the degree. Given that we all hope to be at that point in the near future it’s worth discussing it here.

About half way through your degree you might realize that you put in a long time and effort but have very little to show for it. In marathon running this point is known as “hitting the wall” – the point where when you run out of energy to continue your race.

Click here to continue reading!!

New Post on Gradifying: Picking A Supervisor and Other Concerns

One of the crucial factors in graduate school success is a good supervisor. While some faculties mandate that you come in with an identified supervisor, others let you start your program and identify a supervisor several months into your degree. Picking a supervisor is a very difficult decision and one that shouldn’t be made lightly.

Sometimes there is an obvious person; especially if you have a defined research interests in mind. However, if you don’t really know, or you have a multitude of interests, your options are quite broad. At that point the question is not “what would you like to study” but “who will give you the best environment to study in.”

I’ll highlight what I think is important to talk about with your potential supervisor, or to at least consider, before you make any decisions. However, everyone has different perspectives, and I encourage you to give your opinions in the comments section below. I’ve also discussed this issue on my other blog (Mr Epidemiology) and I encourage you to take a read of that.

Click here to continue reading!!

New Post On Gradifying: Queen’s Frosh Week As Told By Star Wars GIFs

Opening

My colleagues have touched on some of the more serious issues of the day. However, when I arrived at Queen’s, I had bigger questions: Why do people keep yelling “how do you feel?” What’s a “greasepole” and why do people want to climb it? And most importantly, why are there purple people?

For those of you who are confused, lucky you are. Guide you through perils of Queen’s University Frosh Week I will. Ways of the Frosh you will know. Laugh you shall. Yes. Hrmmmmmmmmm.

Also, you should listen to this in the background as you read.

So, without further ado …

Crawl

Click here to continue reading!!

No New Posts For A While

This was my arm after the accident. I’m sure these are the technical terms the Ortho and ER staff use to describe such injuries.

Those of you who follow me on Twitter will know that last week, I was in a biking accident on my way to work. While avoiding a pedestrian, I hit the curb and fell off my bike, resulting in me breaking both the radius and ulna in my left arm. I’m going to try and work around it, but there likely won’t be any new posts in the next little while as I deal with the monster cast I have on and then rehab.

I was very fortunate to make it out with just the one injury to my arm and some road rash. Luckily, because I was wearing my bike helmet, I was saved from any major head injury. So, in short:

Please, please, please, if you’re riding a bike, wear a helmet.

I’ve literally biked this route every day from March – October every year that I’ve been in Kingston. If I wasn’t wearing my helmet, I don’t know if I’d be writing this message to you today.

Special thanks to the paramedics and all the wonderful doctors, nurses and PCAs at the Kingston General Hospital who helped put me back together. You guys are awesome 🙂

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: