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Mr Epidemiology

No, I'm not a skin doctor

Month

December 2011

Interesting reads: December 25th – 31st, 2011

Some honesty from a statistics textbook

And so 2011 comes to a close. It’s been a great year, and the next one promises to be even better. I like to tweet random things (follow me @MrEpid), but for those who don’t use Twitter, here is my final roundup:

  • The 9 Oddest Job Interview Questions. The hourglass question threw me for a bit, and so I spent the next little while trying to figure it out.
  • A great read entitled “The Disposable Academic.”
  • io9 had a great piece up about the 10 photos that changed science. It’s incredible to see those seminal photos and realize how much of an impact they had on our lives.
  • I imagine many of my readers are coming up with new year’s resolutions. This guide should help you accomplish that.
  • Finally, while 2012 might not be the end of the world, a group at Johns Hopkins proposes a new system that would revolutionize our calendar.
Happy New Year everyone!

-Atif

Interesting reads: December 18th – 24th, 2011

An Honorable Mention from the National Geographic Places Photo Contest

I like to tweet random things (follow me @MrEpid), but for those who don’t use Twitter, here are some interesting posts I’ve come across this past week:

Have a great holiday everybody!

-Atif

Interesting reads: December 12th – 17th, 2011

I like to tweet random things (follow me @MrEpid), but for those who don’t use Twitter, here are some interesting posts I’ve come across this past week:

Have a great weekend everybody!

-Atif

Interesting reads: December 4th – 11th, 2011

Actually Ryan, yes. A paper from my Masters had a p value of 0.054. It reduced me to tears.

I like to tweet random things (follow me @MrEpid), but for those who don’t use Twitter, here are some interesting posts I’ve come across this past week:

  • The above pic is from a series entitled “Biostats Ryan Gosling.” It’s taken my department by storm, and my labmate Katie has made him our Official Lab Mascot ™
  • An essay written by Dan Savage caused a bit of an uproar this week, when a reader responded “Hello, I am Fat.” Lindy West (the author) makes some great arguments, including “You are not concerned about my health. Because if you were concerned about my health, you would also be concerned about my mental health, which has spent the past 28 years being slowly eroded by statements like the above.” Dan Savage responds here.
  • 17 year old Angela Zhang won $100,000 for discovering a cancer-killing nanoparticle. I don’t know about you guys, but at 17 I was figuring out how to play pool, and trying to get my Bon Jovi tribute band off the ground.
  • A great article on the Huffington Post with public speaking tips. While the article is aimed at women, both genders can benefit from the author’s advice.
  • Friend of the blog Travis Saunders writes about how research doesn’t exist in a vacuum
  • Yoni Freedhoff got a book deal!
Have a great weekend everybody!

-Atif

Happy Holidays!

AtifsPhotos-9
Click the photo to see more of my work on Flickr! 🙂

So we’re finally coming to the end of 2011, and with lots of things that need to get done before then, I’m going to be taking a short hiatus from blogging. I’ll still be posting my weekly roundups though, and will be back with new content and posts in January.

If you read anything that you think I might find interesting, or have any ideas you’d like me to cover, feel free to drop me a line.

Until then, why don’t you explore the archives?

Happy Holidays!

– Mr Epidemiology

Roundtable Wrap Up!

TSO Show
Happy Holidays! This pic is from the Trans-Siberian Orchestra's show in Ottawa on November 23rd, 2011 (Click to enlarge)

Just a quick post today – as many of you know, December is an incredibly busy month as everyone gets those last few projects completed before they leave for Christmas. Between meetings, PhD work and other projects, I’ve been busy.

First off, I just wanted to thank all of you for your feedback regarding the blog roundtable. I really enjoyed doing it, and it was a great experience. I’ve updated the original post with links to all the questions presented to the panel, so feel free to browse through the archives and comment on the old posts.

Secondly, the roundtable has been picked up by many different people! And thank all of you for sharing the series. It’s amazing to see just how quickly information can spread through the web – the roundtable was posted by people at Stanford, the University of Nebraska – Lincoln, Grad Studies at SFU, and a Biochemistry, Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology lab at UC Davis. This is in addition to the panellists posting it on their own websites. So thanks everyone for sharing the piece, and I’m glad you have found it useful.

Finally, I know this wasn’t by any means an exhaustive piece on graduate school. As reader Stephanie Prince pointed out: I didn’t include any students with families. That is a whole other dynamic that I can’t speak to, but, if there is interest, I would definitely be interested in doing another roundtable with a more diverse group of people and talking about issues that impact them in their lives. This can include those who switched degrees, mature students, those with families, international students etc. So if you are one of those groups (or another I have missed) and would like to volunteer your time, please don’t hesitate to let me know. On the other hand, if you have any questions you would like me to address in the next roundtable, feel free to shoot me an email and I’ll try to include it next time.

Interesting reads: November 27th – December 3rd, 2011

It's true.

I like to tweet random things (follow me @MrEpid), but for those who don’t use Twitter, here are some interesting posts I’ve come across this past week:

Have a great weekend everybody!

-Atif

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